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NICOTINE AS A FILM PROTAGONIST

Nicotine as a film protagonist. Let’s take a look at 5 famous films where we find nicotine as a protagonist. This week we reviewed some films where nicotine plays a key role. The 70 cigarettes a day that Ian Fleming smoked inspired Agent 007 in all its versions. From Humphrey Bogart to James Dean, everyone transformed the cigarette into a screen icon.

“Coffee and Cigarettes” (2003)

We could say that this movie by Jim Jarmusch works as an apology for coffee and cigarette. But supporting the industry is far from the purpose of this great independent filmmaker who took 10 years to complete the film, recording 11 shorts that circulate around the two elements of the title. From a delirious conversation between Roberto Benigni and humorist Steven Wright, to the uncomfortable encounter between two uneven cousins ​​(both interpreted by Cate Blanchett) to a dialogue between the rockers Tom Waits and Iggy Pop, lost in some desolate bar of deep North America .

With “Coffee and Cigarattes”, Jarmusch demonstrates the social role of the cigarette and a cup of coffee. Here, Nicotine is this film protagonist. In the last short-centered on two old men who smoke on the roof of a building and remember the old bohemia of Paris and New York – the filmmaker also presents the cigarette as an ideal medium for evocation.

“Rebel Without a Cause “(1955)

“I renounce imagining James Dean, embodying Jim Stark in the mythical” Rebel Without a Cause, “without an unfiltered cigarette in his mouth. It is his youthful identity,” wrote Spanish film critic Pedro Crespo. And he’s right. Because in this classic of Nicholas Ray, the cigarette hanging from the lips of Dean is a reflection of his nihilistic and rebellious attitude to life. He even smokes while competing in a dangerous car race.

Will smoking have increased after the movie? Youth began to imitate the adolescent idol and smoking became synonymous with being cool.

“Rebel without a cause” set behavior patterns, demonstrated the influence that cinema can have on people’s lives.

“The James Bond Saga”

Ian Fleming, creator of Agent 007, smoked 70 cigarettes a day. Probably for this reason his character is inseparable from nicotine, especially in the era of Sean Connery. With elegance and a certain disdain, the actor had the ability to appear with his classic “Bond … James Bond” without taking the cigarette out of his mouth.

In “Thunderball” (1965), Q. presents to Bond a new invention that has the appearance of the metallic wrapping of a Cuban cigar “Romeo and Juliet Churchill”. As a good smoker, the agent is left with the desire to prove it. Thirty-four years later, “The world is not enough” (1999) will offer a humorous wink to this repressed desire, with a Pierce Brosnan who will try to take some time in the middle of the action to smoke the Cuban cigarette. He ends up handing it to Moneypenny, who throws it away.

Both films address the taste of the agent for tobacco, but welcoming the policies of the times against the cigarette. In the Connery era, smoking was synonymous with elegance. By the  1990s there was social concern about the subject.

“Thanks for Smoking” (2005)

This is probably the movie about cigarettes with fewer tobacco scenes on the screen. But director Jason Reitman’s (Juno) interest is in the back room of the industry, with an executive (Aaron Eckhart) who makes a living defending the rights of smokers and the tobacco company he works for.

Rob Lowe plays his partner, a guy who plays Hollywood, trying to get the movies to include more scenes of cigarettes. But Reitman’s satire attacks everywhere, also questioning the detractors of nicotine.

Robert Duvall excels as an industry zar who longs for the old days, when smoking was accepted.

“Basic instincts” (1992)

Joe Esterzhas, the screenwriter for this erotic thriller, said: “A movie star with a cigar in his hand is like a revolver targeting a 12-year-old boy.” Embracing that idea, she constructed the character of Catherine Tramell (Sharon Stone). She was as a dangerous femme fatale shielded by her cigarettes, especially in the remembered interrogation scene. She seduces Michael Douglas by smoke and provocation.

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